Reduplicated Compounds in Turkish?

Aug. 18th, 2017 10:28 pm
[syndicated profile] languagehat_feed

Posted by languagehat

Bruce Allen writes:

Oedipus Schmoedipus — so long as he loves his mother.

Years and years ago, I had a professor of Greek who said that this particular kind of reduplicated rhyming compound (schm-) originated not in Yiddish, but in Turkish.

I don’t find anything to substantiate this and he died years ago, but I figure if anyone can shed light on it, it’s LH readers, if not yourself.

I can’t shed light myself, so I turn it over to the assembled illuminators.

yhlee: Sandman raven with eyeball (Sandman raven (credit: rilina))
[personal profile] yhlee
I did not finish this book not because I thought it was poorly argued or poorly written, but because, despite it being very interesting, I just cannot brain this right now. (I'm under deadline for a novel.)

Heath Fogg Davis is a trans man and associate professor in political science at Temple University, and his book, Beyond Trans: Does Gender Matter? suggests that there are many situations in which clinging to gender categories is not necessary and even counterproductive. The context appears to largely be USAn, although I only got a little way into the book so that might not be true of later chapters.

The book opens with the case of a public transit system in Philadelphia that used to issue passes in both male and female variants. It begins with the dilemma of a trans woman who bought a female pass, only to be bounced off the bus because the bus driver judged her not to be a "real" woman, so she bought a male pass, and was bounced off the bus for not being male. At that point, she's screwed--what does she do? But trans people weren't the only one hit by this--a lot of cis people who didn't match certain bus drivers' preconceptions of gender presentation/appearance were also sometimes denied passage.

Davis then goes on to examine the reason why bus passes even had this designation to begin with. Apparently the stated intent was to reduce fraud--basically, each person was supposed to buy their own pass, and they were trying to prevent husbands and wives from sharing a single pass. Except, of course, if you look at the problem and the "solution," it makes no sense--you could easily still have fraud with two people of the same "sex" (whatever that means, a topic Davis takes up later) sharing a pass. So basically the "solution" screwed a lot of people, was intrusive and humiliating, and didn't even solve the problem.

The chapters in this book are:

Introduction: Sex Stickers
1. The Sex Markers We Carry: Sex-Marked Identity Documents
2. Bathroom Bouncers: Sex-Segregated Restrooms [1]
3. Checking a Sex Box to Get into College: Single-Sex Admissions
4. Seeing Sex in the Body: Sex-Segregated Sports
Conclusion: Silence on the Bus
Appendix: The Gender Audit: A How-to Guide for Organizations

[1] I lived for two years in a dorm in undergrad that had co-ed restrooms. Nothing bad happened. My dad would have blown a gasket if he had found out, though. :p

I only got through the intro and the very beginning of chapter 1 and what I saw looked encouraging and thought-provoking, but please don't ask me what's in the rest of the book because I genuinely don't know. I'm going to return this and hope to check it out later when I have more brain so I can think about the issues properly; it's good knowing the book exists so I can return to it at some later point.

New Books and ARCs, 8/18/17

Aug. 18th, 2017 08:44 pm
[syndicated profile] scalziwhatever_feed

Posted by John Scalzi

A very fine collection of new books and ARCs arrived to the Scalzi Compound in the last week, and here’s what they are! See anything you’d like on your own shelves? Tell us all in the comments.


"Warding gestures*

Aug. 18th, 2017 02:48 pm
rosefox: A person in a gas mask. (safety)
[personal profile] rosefox
My body: A tiny bit of post-nasal drip leading to slight throat soreness, probably just allerg—

Me: NINE HOURS OF SLEEP, STEAMY SHOWER WITH PINE AND MINT ESSENCE, NASAL RINSE, SALT-WATER GARGLE, ANTIHISTAMINE NASAL SPRAY, STEROID NASAL SPRAY, CLARITIN, AGGRESSIVE TOOTHBRUSHING

My body: —look, forget i said anything, okay?


I refuse to get sick. REFUSE. R E F U S E. J has had a horrid cough for a week and is on antibiotics and prednisone (when they prescribe prednisone to the guy with insomnia, you know it's bad), X is wrapping up a course of antibiotics for a throat infection, and J had to do that for his own throat infection last month. So far I've been fighting off all the respiratory bugs Kit brings home from daycare, but I don't take my ability to do that for granted. And I can't take most antibiotics without serious mood effects because apparently I depend on my gut flora for emotional management, so I have to be extremely diligent about my preventive care.

I'm going to go have spicy curry for lunch and drink some ginger honey tea. Fuck off, germs.

Combatting the Green Menace

Aug. 18th, 2017 02:49 pm
robling_t: (Default)
[personal profile] robling_t
So, this... happened:



Went on a fridge-pickling rampage and did some tinkering to an initial recipe to rebalance it more to my liking:


  • 1 cup vinegar
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 3 tbsp sugar
  • 2 tsp salt


Mix together and heat/stir until sugar dissolves. Pour over 2 cups cut-up cucumbers and bung in the fridge. Will allegedly keep for a month.



One notes that at current exchange rates 2 cups = +/- 1 cucumber. That big one on the left, for example, which I gave away to more responsible picklers than myself, would have been at least 3 cups.

TFS on TNT!

Aug. 18th, 2017 01:02 pm
[syndicated profile] nkjemisin_feed

Posted by nkjemisin

So, for the handful of you who don’t follow me on social media, I had a little surprise to share the other night! There’s not much I can say about this, for now. I jokingly answered a few questions on the night of the announcement, but the truth is that I don’t really know enough […]

This One's For The Girls

Aug. 18th, 2017 01:00 pm
[syndicated profile] cakewrecks_feed

Posted by Jen

(ATTENTION MOMS: this post may be mildly inappropriate for young children.)

 

Alright ladies, it's OUR turn.

That's right: it's time to turn the tables on all those chauvinistic guys who order the boob or butt cakes, rendering the female form as nothing more than an object - and an edible one at that! It's time to ogle the MALE form in cake for once, and show them how it feels! You heard me, gentlemen: prepare... to be objectified!! [rubbing hands together] Heheheh. This is gonna be awesome.

Ok, let's start the show!

First up, ladies, check out this sexy little...

Oh.

["Urp"ing noise]

Sorry, sorry. Uh, yeah, Julie B.? This one's really not doing anything for me. In fact, the neck hump area is kind of grossing me out.

 

Not to worry, though; there's more where that came from. Next!

Huh.

Um, Donna B., not that I don't appreciate the liberal use of painted-on under-arm hair (and other hair which I was kind enough to cover - you're welcome) and the whole "good luck on your wedding night" sentiment, but again, this is really having more of the opposite effect on me. Maybe it has something to do with the fact that it looks like the chest of a pasty-white prepubescent.

 

Ohhhkay. Now I just creeped myself out, looking at this. [averting eyes] Next! NEXT!!

Whoa! I think we just went to the other extreme; this guys looks to be about 70. And is it just me, or does he have a bunch of raisins on his chest? That, or his chest hair has gone all matted and clumpy.

[gagging] Rapidly. Losing. Appetite.

By the way, Amanda E., not that I'm complaining, but I don't think he has any nipples. Again, NOT complaining. Really. Put those raisins down, woman!

 

Oh, look: Tam & Annabel found Mr. Heard-it-through-the-grapevine's bottom half, and it begs the question...

Is acupuncture ever a good package deal? Just wondering.

 

Ok, this is ridiculous. I don't feel like we've objectified any guys at all with these cakes! Sarah W., you're our last hope. Bring it, sistah.

Aaaugh!! My eyes! My seared, bleeding eyes!

What this headless, neckless, armless, and legless torso lacks in limbs it certainly makes up for with day-glo orange streakiness. Not to mention that it exudes a kind of sinister intelligence: I swear it's looking at me.

In fact, here's a hypothetical for y'all: You get up in the middle of the night, and turn suddenly to find this cake hopping along behind you. Do you:

a) scream
b) laugh
c) grab a fork or
d) all of the above?

[sigh]

Well, ladies, I'm sorry: our quest to objectify men using cakes has failed. But on the bright side, we'll always have Tom Selleck - right?

*****

Thank you for using our Amazon links to shop! USA, UK, Canada.

[syndicated profile] dinosaur_comics_feed
archive - contact - sexy exciting merchandise - search - about
August 18th, 2017next

August 18th, 2017: This week I have been at a delightful cottage and it has been delightful! I recommend: delightful cottages. Thank you for your time and attention.

– Ryan

Reenu-You by Michele Tracy Berger

Aug. 18th, 2017 07:00 am
[syndicated profile] strangehorizons_feed

Posted by Sessily Watt

Reenu-You, Michele Tracy Berger's novella from Book Smugglers Publishing's Novella Initiative, outlines the space of its storytelling early. “The politicians, bureaucrats, and scientists shouldn't be the only ones who get to have their say about the virus and what it did,” says Kat, the primary perspective character, describing both her aim and the novella's overall focus (Ch. 1). Of the many perspectives that appear in the following chapters, memos, transcripts, and news stories, few are politicians, bureaucrats, or scientists. With a few exceptions, those typical authorities are not given the opportunity to speak for themselves. Instead, Berger gives us voices of the community directly affected by her fictional epidemic, primarily African American and Latina women.

This focus reminded me of A Paradise Built in Hell, Rebecca Solnit's 2009 book about disasters and their aftermaths. Solnit draws a line between the mythos about disasters believed and repeated by those with authority—often politicians and bureaucrats, and even scientists—and the direct experience of those who live through a disaster. The “official” mythos states that disasters destroy the social fabric, turning people against each other in a panic. This official story is used as an excuse by those in authority to hoard information and resources, causing more violence on top of what has already been wreaked by the earthquake or hurricane or flooding. The disaster mythos tells a story of separation and division, whereas those in the middle of the disaster often experience deep connection and even, unexpectedly and counterintuitively, an experience of joy, “an emotion graver than happiness but deeply positive” (Solnit, p. 5). The disasters that Solnit uses as case studies are all more immediate than the slow, anxious spread of an epidemic, like that of the virus in Reenu-You, but the commonality remains. It feels strange to say so, but there is joy in this novella. A grave and important joy rooted in connection and community.

There are many details that point away from joy. Death is a constant background presence from the opening pages, in which Kat describes the ways she once thought she would die: “severing delicate tendons,” “breaking my lower back,” “a massive heart attack.” Later, there is real death, and moments of real body horror, not just the imagined kind. Another character, Constancia, begins losing her hair because of the virus, the loss described like an alien creature: “the little globby bits of hair follicles were swollen white masses at the end of the hairs” (Ch. 3). This is the language of horror, of alienation from one's own body, not the language of joy.

The novella never leaves horror and alienation entirely behind. Kat and the other women infected by the virus travel through a series of waiting rooms, where they sit in silence punctuated by moments of outrage and confusion. They try to share information with the doctors and staff, but are talked over, their perspectives ignored. In a key moment, the women in the waiting room determine that they all have used the same hair relaxer, marketed as “Reenu-You,” but their triumphant discovery is under-played by the doctors. “I realized they had no real idea what a hair relaxer really was or what it did,” says Kat. “I felt myself becoming invisible to them. We were all becoming invisible to them” (Ch. 5). Instead of connection, the women in the waiting room are isolated, kept away from the conclusions and theories being shared about their bodies.

The isolation of the waiting rooms is a counterpoint to the connection that five of the women find when they gather on their own terms. They stay up late talking, delving into their commonalities and their differences, all the little pieces that make up who they are. Kat marvels: “These women were actually curious about other people. About me” (Ch. 7). Here, with these women, she is not invisible, as she was in the waiting room and as she has been, she realizes, in so much of her life. The source of the joy in the novella is in the gathering of these five women, their similarities and differences weaving together into a new way of being: “it felt like we had escaped to a new emotional territory, a comfort zone in the city” (Ch. 9).

The joy the women find together is not simple, especially as it seems to be caused by the virus itself. The official perspective would characterize their connection as a part of their illness. This perspective is exemplified by a “Classified CIA Memo” that appears as an interlude between two chapters. The memo reduces the growing connections between the women to “undesirable and unintentional side effects” and mentions that “test subjects” with these side effects were “terminated.” The women, too, have mixed feelings about the virus and their growing connections. Kat observes, at one point: “It was the same sensation I had been feeling with these women all along over the past few days: part compulsion to be next to each other as dictated by the goddamn Reenu-You virus, but part because I wanted to” (Ch. 14). Like the CIA, she sees the virus imposing changes, and resists that imposition. Unlike the CIA, however, she can also see her own choices and interests intermingled with the virus. This is joy found in the midst of horror, not joy that drives horror away.

Or, to put it another way, the companionship between the women exists in “a psychological boundary of both pain and pleasure.” This phrase appears in a brief afterword in which Berger talks about the inspirations and influences for the novella, in particular the socio-political history of African American hair in the United States. The painful history, and present, of hair as a vector for racist violence and oppression mixes with the pleasure and pride of “hair as a space for creativity and innovation.” The psychological boundary she describes is multi-faceted, containing contradictions, uncertainties, and shifts toward one direction or the other. And it is within this psychological boundary that the events of Reenu-You take place, from the use of the relaxer to the companionship and community of the women.

My favorite moments are those that take place within that community, as the women manage the joy they find in each other's company and the havoc created by the virus that has brought them together. As a result, I was disappointed when the novella pulled away in later chapters, which turn to summarizing events. The many perspectives included, however briefly, also raise questions about other perspectives not included. Most notably, the choice to include a CIA memo about the virus's links to American activities in Malaysia seems to contradict the novella's focus. Why not instead include the perspective of one of the CIA's “test subjects,” or of a Malaysian witness swept up in these events like Kat and the other women?

But these absences don't take away from what the novella does include, from corporate malfeasance and classified government experimentation, to the American obsession with all-natural products, all set within the New York City of the 1990s. Berger fits a lot into the brief space allotted by the novella form, presenting a story that's part horror, part thriller, part emotional revelation. The result is engaging and complicated, and full without being dense.


Move 6 status check

Aug. 17th, 2017 10:26 pm
yhlee: a clock face in blue and gold (hxx clock)
[personal profile] yhlee posting in [community profile] hexarchate_rpg
Status check for Move 6, still ongoing.

- In the airlock working out logistics are: Sulen, Ashari, Ankat, Mikodez, EDITED: Yehan, Iawa

- In Engineering, discussing communications with Mothra: Alaric, Sasha

- EDITED: Kaliyan, in the cockpit

Still waiting to hear from:

- Virmad, last in the airlock

If you're content to stand pat (so to speak), just drop a comment to this post to let me know. If you're looking for something more plot-hook-ish for your specific character and the move isn't doing it for you, please feel free to drop me a line so I can give you more to work with either now or moving forward.

(Or if you're busy due to Real Life and have a moment, letting me know that can also be helpful.)

Jesus of the ...

Aug. 17th, 2017 10:54 pm
asakiyume: (far horizon)
[personal profile] asakiyume
This font for holy water was in a model seventeenth-century Acadian house on the grounds of a historic gardens in Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia.

If you click through and look at Jesus up close, doesn't he seem strange? Otherworldly in an unexpected way, as if the painter had a vision of Jesus of the fishes, or Jesus as a curl of smoke, or Jesus whose body is a shroud, about to be lifted away.

Holy water

"Have I told you lately"

Aug. 17th, 2017 08:38 pm
rosefox: Me looking at Kit and both of us grinning. (me and kit)
[personal profile] rosefox
It's my late night at the office. I videocalled home to say goodnight to the baby. They were tired, so after a while they waved bye-bye. I said "Okay, Kit, bye-bye! I love you!" and signed love you.

And they signed love back.

Me: [tears]
X: [tears]
Kit: [earnestly signing love at the camera]

My baby told me they love me. I'll just be here in a little melted puddle forever.

Free Speech and Nazis

Aug. 17th, 2017 08:42 pm
jimhines: (Snoopy Writing)
[personal profile] jimhines

Like many of us, I’ve been struggling to process what happened in Charlottesville over the weekend, and what’s been happening in this country for a while now. The racism and hatred and violence didn’t magically appear out of nowhere. It’s been building up for a long time…in fact, much of it has always been there. It’s just boiling over into the open right now, making it harder (but obviously not impossible) to look away and pretend it’s not happening.

Part of the argument I’ve seen centers around free speech and the First Amendment. Free speech is a right, an important one, and rights apply to everyone. Even people you dislike and disagree with.

But freedom of speech in this country is not and has never been limitless. From the U.S. Federal Courts, here are a few examples of actions not legally protected by freedom of speech:

  • Students making an obscene speech at a school-sponsored event.
  • Making/distributing obscene materials.
  • Inciting actions that would harm others (e.g., Shouting “fire” in a crowded theater.)

Now, here are some of the “alt-right” protesters who gathered in Charlottesville.

Read the rest of this entry » )

Mirrored from Jim C. Hines.

Profile

ann_leckie: (Default)
ann_leckie

August 2017

S M T W T F S
  12345
6789101112
131415 1617 1819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Aug. 19th, 2017 01:34 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios